The Hall of Heorot

The Foremost of Halls Under Heaven

10 notes

brettzwo:

In honor of the recent Scottish cry for freeeedom! and for lovers of liberty around the world.

The thistle has been the national emblem of Scotland since the reign of Alexander III (1249–1286) and was used on silver coins issued by James III in 1470. The thistle is also the emblem of Encyclopædia Britannica, which originated in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Origin as a symbol of Scotland -
According to a legend, an invading Norse army was attempting to sneak up at night upon a Scottish army’s encampment. During this operation one barefoot Norseman had the misfortune to step upon a thistle, causing him to cry out in pain, thus alerting Scots to the presence of the Norse invaders. Some sources suggest the specific occasion was the Battle of Largs, which marked the beginning of the departure of King Haakon IV (Haakon the Elder) of Norway who, having control of the Northern Isles and Hebrides, had harried the coast of the Kingdom of Scotland for some years.

It is also used to symbolize connection with Scotland overseas. For example in Canada, it is one of the four floral emblems on the flag of Montreal; in the US, Carnegie Mellon University features the thistle in its crest in honor of the Scottish heritage of its founder, Andrew Carnegie.

brettzwo:

In honor of the recent Scottish cry for freeeedom! and for lovers of liberty around the world.

The thistle has been the national emblem of Scotland since the reign of Alexander III (1249–1286) and was used on silver coins issued by James III in 1470. The thistle is also the emblem of Encyclopædia Britannica, which originated in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Origin as a symbol of Scotland -
According to a legend, an invading Norse army was attempting to sneak up at night upon a Scottish army’s encampment. During this operation one barefoot Norseman had the misfortune to step upon a thistle, causing him to cry out in pain, thus alerting Scots to the presence of the Norse invaders. Some sources suggest the specific occasion was the Battle of Largs, which marked the beginning of the departure of King Haakon IV (Haakon the Elder) of Norway who, having control of the Northern Isles and Hebrides, had harried the coast of the Kingdom of Scotland for some years.

It is also used to symbolize connection with Scotland overseas. For example in Canada, it is one of the four floral emblems on the flag of Montreal; in the US, Carnegie Mellon University features the thistle in its crest in honor of the Scottish heritage of its founder, Andrew Carnegie.

7 notes

Rustic Viking Sax

den-frusna-eken:

Now available in my shop: Rustic Viking Sax with Sheath - $60

This knife is made in the style of the seax (Old Norse “sax”) which was popular in Old Norse as well as Anglo-Saxon cultures. The name literally means “knife” in Old English and was the word from which the name of the Saxons was derived. The knife shown is done in the more Norse style which featured a straight spine and bellied blade, similar to modern kitchen knives, but I can also make it in the broken-back style as was popular in Anglo-Saxon areas.

The blade is made from high-carbon steel with a full tang and has a sharp edge which is heat-treated in order to keep its edge and the spine is tempered in order to make it softer to resist shattering. It is semi-polished using fine-grained sandpaper and steel wool to the degree that would be historically common, also giving it a rustic look as opposed to a mirror-polish. The handle can be done in either wood or antler, and I can do simple wood burning on either material as shown in the display pictures. The handle will be drilled out to fit the tang of the blade and then the two pieces will be epoxied together as was a common traditional method.

The sheath is made from high-quality lightweight leather with a belt strap which allows for wearing on either side. The rivets can be done in either nickel or more period correct copper. Standard overall length is about 10” with a 6” blade, but I can make it longer or shorter to a degree if desired.

78 notes

megachikorita:

some kid in my class wrote an essay about how it never explicitly says Beowulf isn’t a robot

Ok then. I’d imagine that’d probably have to do with the fact that robots weren’t even imagined of yet, but you know, whatever…

3 notes

blot-this-galaxy asked: OK, so I was supposed to read Beowulf in high school and I absolutely did not do it. Seeking to rectify my past mistakes, I picked up a used copy last month, but my book pile is so large right now that I haven't gotten around to it... Anyway, you've gotten me very excited about it now, and it's traveling with me next week. Can't wait!

I’m so happy that I helped someone become interested in Beowulf!